Best Resources for Poets and WritersWinning Writers
IN THIS ISSUE

Tom Howard/John H. Reid Poetry Contest Winners Announced

Recent Honors for Our Subscribers

Recent Publication Credits for Our Subscribers

The Best Free Poetry Contests, February-March

Notable Free Prose Contests, February-March

Calls for Submissions

Featured Poem:
"Praise Poem" by Stephen Derwent Partington


Featured Poem:
"News of The Nameless" by Veronica Golos


Featured Poem:
"Their Tranquil Lives" by Kathleen Spivack


Featured Poem:
"The Sandpile at Eleven" by John Alexanderson


Advertise in This Newsletter

Critique of "Jubilate Agno" by Jack Goodman

Newsletter Archives



WINNING WRITERS NEWSLETTER
February 2011

One of the "101 Best Websites for Writers"
Writer's Digest, 2005-2010


Welcome to our February newsletter. This is the companion to our online database, The Best Free Poetry Contests. It alerts you to upcoming contests and important contest changes, highlights quality resources for writers, and announces achievements and great poems by our readers.

Lost one of our newsletters? Formatting doesn't look right? Not to worry. All our recent newsletters are posted online at http://www.winningwriters.com/news

Coming March 1: Award-Winning Poems
Each quarter we publish a special edition of this newsletter featuring winning poems from contests we admire. The next edition is March 1. Please watch for it in your mailbox!

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FEATURED SPONSOR'S MESSAGE

Carpe Articulum Literary Review

Welcome to Carpe Articulum Literary Review!
This has been an incredibly exciting quarter, and we are thrilled to introduce you to our new guests, just in time for our most popular issue, the Spring Edition. Every quarter we bring you a famous author or authority to talk about what is happening in the literary world.

This quarter we feature an exclusive interview with LORD (CHARLES) SPENCER, NINTH EARL SPENCER about the literary festival at his ancestral home, The Althorp Estate, his favourite reads, and his Sister Princess Diana's charitable legacy.

Also, we feature an exclusive interview with MARK VICTOR HANSEN, world bestselling author with over 157 million books sold! He introduces his new book with co-author BILL FROEHLICH, movie producer/director and discusses its divergence from his wildly famous Chicken Soup For the Soul series.

This quarter also features magnificent poetry by emergent writers, several of whom are being published for the first time! The Non-Fiction category is another tour de force this issue as well with a special highlight on an Iraqi writer who shares his experiences in The Scent of Rima's Gardenias. International and cross-cultural writing is a specialty of ours here at CALR, because it provides a broader platform for writers' and readers' perspectives on the human condition. The short stories are likewise masterful this quarter!
SPECIAL OFFER: SUBMIT TWO ENTRIES FOR THE SAME FEE AS ONE
If you want to submit your work to any of the competition's categories, you may now do so 2 for 1. We are offering an opportunity to submit your second piece free of charge. Simply send it in the same .doc file with your original piece and we will accept both for possible publication. This will apply to as many entries as you would like to send in (i.e. if you want to send in four, you may include eight). This is a one-time opportunity, and is your chance to get your work recognized and published alongside famous authors. INCLUDE THIS PROMOTION CODE WITH YOUR SUBMISSION: WW4,1SPRING
Click to submit online now!
We give away $10,000 every year to outstanding writers and artists and hope you will decide to become a member of our literary family. Enter our fiction, non-fiction, poetry, novella and photography contests at any time of year. If you miss a deadline, your entry will automatically roll over for the next cycle.

The magazine is 150-200 pages of full-colour delight, translated into five languages. We feature short fiction, poetry, informative articles, photography, non-fiction and incredible interviews with hot up-and-coming writers as well as iconic ones such as Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni, George Lucas (Star Wars, Indiana Jones), Ray Harryhausen (father of motion picture special effects), Ray Bradbury (author of Fahrenheit 451), Jodi Picoult (author of Change of Heart, Handle With Care, Nineteen Minutes, and My Sister's Keeper which was made into a major motion picture with Cameron Diaz) and Nicholas Sparks (author of Message in a Bottle, also made into a motion picture with Kevin Costner & Robin Wright Penn, as well as The Notebook, The Last Song, etc.) And that is just this October issue!

Please enjoy this gratis electronic issue featuring Barbara Ehrenreich, Stan Jones and Bruce Piasecki:
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We hope you will join us and become a vital part of our literary family—without you, none of this is possible nor necessary. Become a cherished reader today!

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CONTESTS HOSTED AT WINNING WRITERS & OPEN NOW

Tom Howard/John H. Reid Short Story Contest Closing Next Month
Tom Howard/John H. Reid Short Story Contest
Postmark Deadline: March 31
Now in its 19th year. Prizes of $3,000, $1,000, $400 and $250 will be awarded, plus six Most Highly Commended Awards of $150 each. Submit any type of short story, essay or other work of prose, up to 5,000 words. You may submit work that has been published or won prizes elsewhere, as long as you own the online publication rights. $15 entry fee. Submit online or by mail. Early submission encouraged. This contest is sponsored by Tom Howard Books and assisted by Winning Writers. Judges: John H. Reid and Dee C. Konrad. See the complete guidelines and past winners.

Wergle Flomp Humor Poetry Contest (no fee)
Online Submission Deadline: April 1
Winning Writers invites you to enter the tenth annual Wergle Flomp Humor Poetry Contest. We'll award $3,600, including a top prize of $1,500. Submit one humor poem online. No length limit. Both published and unpublished poems are welcome. No fee to enter. Final judge: Jendi Reiter. See the complete guidelines and past winners.

War Poetry Contest
Postmark Deadline: May 31
We seek 1-3 original, unpublished poems on the theme of war for our tenth annual contest, up to 500 lines in total. We will award $5,000, including a top prize of $2,000. Submit online or by mail. The entry fee is $15. Final judge: Jendi Reiter. See the complete guidelines and past winners.

Margaret Reid Poetry Contest for Traditional Verse
Postmark Deadline: June 30
Now in its eighth year, this contest seeks poetry in traditional verse forms such as sonnets and free verse. You may submit work that has been published or won prizes elsewhere, as long as you own the online publication rights. Prizes of $3,000, $1,000, $400 and $250 will be awarded, plus six Most Highly Commended Awards of $150 each. The entry fee is $7 for every 25 lines you submit. Submit online or by mail. Early submission encouraged. This contest is sponsored by Tom Howard Books and assisted by Winning Writers. Judges: John H. Reid and Dee C. Konrad. See the complete guidelines and past winners.

Tom Howard/John H. Reid Poetry Contest
Postmark Deadline: September 30
Now in its ninth year, this contest seeks poems in any style, theme or genre. You may submit work that has been published or won prizes elsewhere, as long as you own the online publication rights. Prizes of $3,000, $1,000, $400 and $250 will be awarded, plus six Most Highly Commended Awards of $150 each. The entry fee is $7 for every 25 lines you submit. Submit online or by mail. Early submission encouraged. This contest is sponsored by Tom Howard Books and assisted by Winning Writers. Judges: John H. Reid and Dee C. Konrad. See the complete guidelines and past winners.

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Carmine Dandrea TOM HOWARD/JOHN H. REID POETRY CONTEST WINNERS ANNOUNCED
Carmine Dandrea is the winner of the eighth annual Tom Howard/John H. Reid Poetry Contest sponsored by Tom Howard Books. This year's contest awarded $5,850 in cash prizes, including a top prize of $3,000, for the best original poems in any style or theme. Dandrea's colorful narrative "On the Silk Road" chronicles a journey on camelback through diverse regions of China where ancient ways of life persist, from the stark desert to the sensual overload of the bazaars and the tranquil splendor of Buddhist temples. The travelers return to their modern American lifestyle with a new awareness of the omnipresence of the sacred. "On the Silk Road" was judged the best of hundreds of entries from around the world.

Contest judges John H. Reid and Dee C. Konrad said, "The setting is perfect, the language apt, the philosophy sharp... We readers travel every step of that Silk Road with Carmine because we not only see it so clearly through his eyes, but because he creates a journey so relevant to his own life—and our lives as well."

We congratulate Mr. Dandrea, second prize winner Berwyn Moore, third prize winner Dorothy Anne Spruzen, and fourth prize winner Laurence W. Thomas. Eight Most Highly Commended Awards of $150 went to Eileen Baland, John Barrale (two awards), Ellen Ficarra, Netta Gillespie, Carlos Andrés Gómez, Debra Gundy, and Lynn Veach Sadler, bringing the total to $5,850.

Read all of the winning entries, the complete list of winners and the judges' comments. Read the press release. See the guidelines for this year's contest, open now.

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RECENT HONORS FOR OUR NEWSLETTER SUBSCRIBERS
Congratulations to Angela Ortiz-Webb. Her poem "Solibye" won the $100 first prize for poetry in the 2010 Oneswan Productions Writing Competition. This free contest offers a $300 grand prize, plus prizes up to $100 in each genre, for unpublished poetry, fiction, and Christian inspirational essays. Oneswan Productions is a publisher of African-American, women's and inspirational books. The most recent deadline was May 1.

Congratulations to Stephen Derwent Partington. The Kenyan poet's collection How to Euthanise a Cactus (Cinnamon Press, 2010) was one of four books chosen by the influential magazine The Africa Report for their Best Books 2010 feature. The editor's review states: "The political crisis in Kenya triggered by the botched 2007 elections seems to have caught talented young writers off guard. As prose writers search for their voices, it has been the poets who have confronted the crisis and tried to find meaning through it. Partington's new collection is a towering manifestation of poetry's strident return to the literary mainstream. Using media accounts of the violence, Partington points a disturbing finger at the living who remained silent and took sides—and took sides in order to silence." Mr. Partington kindly shares a sample from this collection, "Praise Poem", below. He writes, "This poem seeks to adopt the 'Kenyan praise aesthetic', and adapt it so as not to praise 'Big Men', but the Everyman and Everywoman who resisted the pressure to participate in our post-election violence."

Congratulations to Rick Lupert. His new poetry collection Sinzibuckwud! was released in December by Ain't Got No Press. These poems were written during a week-long adventure in, and on the way to and from, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. "Sinzibuckwud" is the native Canadian word for "Drawn from Wood"...as in maple syrup. Read sample poems on his website, Poetry Super Highway.

Congratulations to Valerie Collins. Her story "Fat Girl" was a finalist in the 2010 Guildford Book Festival Short Story Competition and was published in the anthology Train in the Night. The most recent deadline for this contest for UK-based authors aged 16+ was July 31. In addition, her story "With a Rose Between Her Teeth" was published in the 2010 Writers Abroad anthology. Visit her website to read this story and learn about her book In The Garlic: Your Informative, Fun Guide to Spain, co-authored with Theresa O'Shea.

Congratulations to Evelyn Krieger. Her young adult novel One Is Not a Lonely Number (YM Books, 2010) won a silver medal in the 2011 Sydney Taylor Book Awards from the Association of Jewish Libraries.

Congratulations to Veronica Golos. Her poetry collection Vocabulary of Silence was released this month by Red Hen Press. The book is a response to and meditation upon the continued US wars against Iraq and Afghanistan and the conflicts in Gaza. She kindly shares a sample poem below.


RECENT HONORS FOR POETRY CONTEST INSIDER SUBSCRIBERS
Congratulations to Kathleen Spivack. Her chapbook A History of Yearning won the 2010 Sow's Ear Poetry Chapbook Competition. The submission period for this long-running $1,000 prize is March 1-May 1. A History of Yearning subsequently won first prize for poetry at the London Book Festival, and the runner-up prize (behind Mary Oliver's Swan) at the New England Book Festival. Recent wins for Spivack's individual poems include the Allen Ginsberg Poetry Award, the Erika Mumford Award, and the Paumanok Poetry Award. Prose works and selections from her forthcoming nonfiction book Student! With Robert Lowell and his Famous Circle, Boston 1959-1977 have appeared in The Harvard Review, the North American Review, the Worcester Review, and others. She kindly shares her poem "Their Tranquil Lives" below. This poem was the co-winner of the 2010 Allen Ginsberg Poetry Award from the Poetry Center at Passaic County Community College and was published in The Paterson Literary Review. The current deadline for this $1,000 prize is April 1.

Congratulations to John Alexanderson. His poem "The Sandpile at Eleven" placed first and his poem "Settings" placed third in the 2010 Portland Pen Poetry Contest. He kindly shares his first-prize poem below. The most recent deadline for this $150 prize from the National League of American Pen Women was November 7.


RECENT PUBLICATION CREDITS FOR OUR SUBSCRIBERS
Gerardo Mena's war poems "The Painter" and "Maps" were accepted for the Spring 2011 issue of New Mexico Poetry Review.

Ruth Sabath Rosenthal was the featured poet for Issue 68 of Caught in the Net, a biweekly e-newsletter from the British writers' website The Poetry Kit. The selection included some poems from her new chapbook, Facing Home, published this winter by Finishing Line Press.

Winning Writers Poetry Reviewer Tracy Koretsky's poetry collection Even Before My Own Name received a positive review from Seth Jani at Seven Circle Press. Jani writes, "What makes this book different, and probably better, than most books comprised of mostly confessional elements is that it is a work of a grown, mature individual looking back on these troubled events with a more sober, triumphant eye. A book not only of remembrance, but of survival, as well a hard-won joy. And it is this joy that lends the defining energy to many of these great poems."

Biswajit Ganguly's collection 60 Tanka Poems is now available for purchase as a book or PDF e-book from Lulu.com.

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TRY POETRY CONTEST INSIDER
If you enjoy using The Best Free Poetry Contests, consider upgrading to Poetry Contest Insider. The Best Free Poetry Contests profiles the 150 or so poetry contests that are free to enter. With your Poetry Contest Insider subscription, you'll get access to all of our 750+ poetry contest profiles, plus over 300 of the best prose contests. Search and sort contests by deadline, prize, fee, recommendation level and more. We don't just list contests, we point you to the ones that can benefit your career the most, whether you are just starting out or are well-established. Exclusive interviews with contest judges and editors help you understand how your submissions are evaluated.

We update Poetry Contest Insider nearly every day. Be among the first to learn about new contests and late deadline changes. Access to Poetry Contest Insider is just $9.95 per quarter, with a free 10-day trial at the start. Cancel at any time. Most contests charge entry fees. You can easily spend hundreds of dollars and many hours entering these contests each year. Don't waste your time or money. Out of hundreds of contests, there might only be two or three dozen that are especially appropriate for your work. We help you find them fast. Learn more about Poetry Contest Insider.
"I love using winningwriters.com. I send poems and manuscripts out to probably 20 contests each month from your listings... I recommend it to all my writer friends and students, too. I don't see how a writer can live without it. It's like air or water."
Tom Lombardo, Georgia

See more testimonials here, plus coverage of Winning Writers in Writer's Digest and The Writer, or start your trial now.

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THE BEST FREE POETRY CONTESTS
Deadlines: February 16-March 31

Here is a summary of upcoming free poetry contests. Click the contest names to be taken directly to their profiles (you may be asked to login on your first click of the day). You may also view the profiles by logging in to The Best Free Poetry Contests here and clicking the Find Free Contests link to search for contests by name.

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Please go to http://www.winningwriters.com/forgot_password.php
We will email your password to you within minutes.

Winning Writers gathers contest information from a wide variety of sources including publishers' press releases, online link directories, Poets & Writers Magazine, and e-newsletters such as TOTAL FundsforWriters, The Practicing Writer, and CRWROPPS. We encourage readers to explore these useful resources, and let us know about worthwhile contests we may have missed.

2/16: Memoir (and) Prizes for Prose or Poetry ++
Formerly February 15
Recommended free contest offers twice-yearly prizes for the best memoirs submitted to their magazine during each reading period (November 1-February 16, May 1-August 15). Online submissions preferred. Send 1-5 poems or one prose piece, maximum 10,000 words. See website for art formatting requirements. "Memoir (and) publishes memoirs in many forms. We strive with each issue to include a selection of prose, poetry, graphic memoirs, narrative photography, lies and more." Enter by mail or online.

2/22: Innovations in Reading Prize ++
Recommended free contest sponsored by the National Book Foundation offers $2,500 prizes to individuals, institutions, and collaborative programs that use innovative approaches to successfully inspire a lifelong love of reading. The foundation is looking for creative, risk-taking programs that promote a love of literature and reading as opposed to those focused on literacy or pedagogy. Open to US citizens only. Submit a completed nomination form and reference letter(s) (two if self-nominating; one if nominated by someone else). Enter by email or by mail.

2/25: Collision Poetry & Creative Nonfiction Contest +
Entries must be received by this date; formerly March 7
Twice-yearly neutral free contest from Collision, the University of Pittsburgh's creative nonfiction magazine, offers prizes of $250, $175, $100, plus publication, for poetry and creative nonfiction by undergraduate students anywhere in the world. Entries should be 1-4 poems or 1-2 essays, maximum 10 pages total from any author. Prizes are across all genres, not per genre (personal essays and narratives, travel pieces, feature articles, and poems).

2/28: California Federation of Chaparral Poets Youth Contest +
Formerly February 27
Neutral free contest for California students in grades 7-12 offers prizes up to $50 in each of 6 categories for poems 20 lines maximum. Categories are Junior (grades 7-9), Senior (grades 10-12), Light Verse, and three themed contests: "New Worlds", "Youth's View of Humanity", and "I Remember". No simultaneous submissions.

2/28: Chistell Writing Contest +
Entries must be received by this date
Neutral free contest offers top prizes of $100 for short fiction and poetry, for writers aged 16+ who have never been published in a major publication. Chistell is an independent publisher of popular literature with a focus on African-American women. Send 1-2 poems or one story; online submission only.

3/1: B.J. Rolfzen Creative Writing Contest +
Entries must be received by this date; formerly March 15
Neutral free contest sponsored by singer-songwriter Bob Dylan's hometown of Hibbing, Minnesota offers top prizes of $100 and publication for poems and short stories. Poetry category has two divisions: an open division and a student division for current high school or undergraduate students with no literary publishing credits other than school publications. Enter via online form. Send one poem (maximum 1,000 words) or one story (1,000-4,000 words). "Entries need not be about Bob Dylan or use his style of writing; but they should strive for creativity, originality and literary theme."

3/1: Beverly Hopkins Memorial Poetry Contest for High School Students +
Neutral free contest for high school students living within 100 miles of St. Louis offers prizes of $50 and $35, plus reading at annual poetry concert in May. Send 1-3 poems, any length, that are unpublished and not previously awarded a prize. Entries should be typed, single-spaced, signed with pseudonym only; include a 3"x5" index card with author's real name and pseudonym, address, phone number, email, high school name, and poem titles.

3/1: Brenda L. Smart Grand Prize for Poetry +
Formerly March 9
Neutral free contest offers $500 for poems by North Carolina residents with no published books. Send 2 copies of 1-3 poems. Previous winners, poets with a published book and tenured UNC faculty may not enter.

3/1: Eastern Shore Regional Poetry Contest +
Neutral free contest offers top prize of $100 per age division (children, students, adults, seniors) for poems by residents, students or employees from the following Maryland counties: Caroline, Cecil, Kent, Queen Anne's or Talbot. Send 2 copies of 1-2 poems, 20 stanzas or 3 pages maximum per poem, along with entry form from website.

3/1: Fresh Meadows Poets Teen Poetry Contest +
Entries must be received by this date
Neutral free contest for teen poets living in Queens, NY offers top prize of $150. Submit one poem, any length, that is suitable for a general audience, along with contact information by email to ghnorthrup@earthlink.net.

3/1: Milton Kessler Poetry Book Award ++
Entries must be received by this date
Recommended free contest from Binghamton University offers $1,000 for the best book of poetry published in the previous calendar year by an author over 40, minimum press run 500. Publishers should send 3 copies of published book (no galleys) plus entry form.

3/1: Nantucket Directory Poetry Contest +
Entries must be received by this date
Neutral free contest for poems about Nantucket, MA offers $250 and publication in the print and online editions of the Nantucket Directory phonebook. Authors must be aged 18+. All poems submitted to the contest will be considered for publication in the Nantucket newspaper Yesterday's Island. Submit 1-3 unpublished poems by mail or email.

3/7: Tucson Poetry Festival Statewide High School Poetry Contest +
Formerly March 5
Neutral free contest offers top prize of $400 ($200 in cash) for poems by Arizona high school students. Bilingual or multilingual poems accepted. Winners will be invited to read at the Tucson Poetry Festival in the Spring. One entry per person.

3/14: Arts Club of Washington Scholarship Competition ++
Formerly March 22
Recommended free contest offers scholarships up to $1,500 for college students (including first two years of graduate school) aged 18-26 in Maryland, Virginia, or Washington, DC. 2011 call is for poetry. Submit three copies of poem, up to 300 lines, along with entry form, a photocopy of your student id, and recommendation letter from faculty member at applicant's school.

3/14: Michael Marks Awards for Poetry Pamphlets +++
Entries must be received by this date; formerly March 12
Highly recommended free contest offers two awards of 5,000 pounds: one for the author of a poetry chapbook published or self-published in the UK during the previous calendar year, and one for an outstanding UK publisher of poetry chapbooks. Books should be no more than 36 pages. For the author's award, send 5 copies of book and entry form. Eligible publishers must have published at least 4 chapbooks in the past year. Send one copy of each title published in that year, plus entry form and supporting materials, as outlined on the guidelines page.

3/15: Lynn DeCaro Poetry Contest +
Neutral free contest offers prizes of $75, $50, $25 for unpublished poems by Connecticut high school students (public, private, home-schooled or alternative) in grades 9-12. Send 2 copies of 1-3 poems, maximum 40 lines each.

3/15: Paterson Prize for Books for Young People ++
Entries must be received by this date
Recommended free contest offers $500 in each of three age categories: books for Pre-K - Grade 3, Grades 4-6, or Grades 7-12. Books must have been published in the previous calendar year. Send 3 copies of book plus entry form. Sponsored by the Poetry Center at Passaic County Community College.

3/25: Eugene & Marilyn Glick Indiana Authors Award ++
Entries must be received by this date; formerly March 26
Recommended free contest offers prizes up to $10,000 for published authors of poetry, fiction or creative nonfiction books, who were born in Indiana or have lived there for at least five years. Winners must attend the award ceremony and work with their local library to promote related literary programs. Nomination forms may be submitted by mail or online. Finalists will be asked to send copies of their published books.

3/25: Jo-Anne Hirshfield Memorial Poetry Awards +
Formerly March 5
Neutral free contest offers prizes of $100, $50 and $25 in each of four age categories: children who live or attend school in Evanston, IL (grades K-5 and 6-8), and Chicago-area high school students and adults. Send 2 copies of 1-5 unpublished poems by mail or email.

3/25: Nicholas A. Virgilio Memorial Haiku Competition for High School Students +
Entries must be received by this date
Neutral free contest offers six prizes of $50 for the best haiku by students in grades 7-12 as of the previous September (no home-schooled students). Send 1-3 haiku, typed in triplicate on 3"x5" cards, with author's name and contact information on only one copy. No simultaneous submissions. Sponsored by the Haiku Society of America.

3/25: Poetry Matters Award +
Neutral free contest for unpublished poems offers prizes up to $75 in each of four age categories: middle school, high school, adult (ages 20-60), and senior (61+). Winners will be invited to read at the Poetry Matters festival in Evans, GA in April, and videos of their readings will be posted on the contest website. Send 3 poems, any length.

3/30: bpNichol Chapbook Poetry Award ++
Recommended free contest offers C$2,000 for the best English-language poetry chapbook published in Canada in the preceding year. Author or publisher should submit 3 copies of book plus author's curriculum vitae.

3/30: Leonard Milberg '53 Secondary School Poetry Prize ++
Formerly March 29
Recommended free contest sponsored by the Princeton University creative writing program offers prizes up to $500 for unpublished poems by 11th-graders (high school juniors). Submit 1-3 poems, any length. Contest is judged by the Princeton University creative writing faculty, which includes such acclaimed authors as Jeffrey Eugenides and Joyce Carol Oates.

3/31: Foley Poetry Contest ++
Recommended free contest from the Jesuit magazine 'America' offers $1,000 and publication for a poem of 30 lines or less. (Past winning poems have touched on morally significant issues, but have not been "religious" poetry in the conventional sense.) No simultaneous submissions.

3/31: Jacklyn Potter Young Poets Competition +++
Highly recommended free contest for high school students in the Washington, DC region offers two winners an honorarium plus reading at Rock Creek Park with an established poet. Send 5-6 poems, published or unpublished. Sponsored by The Word Works, which also runs a prestigious manuscript prize for adults.

3/31: Lampman-Scott Award ++
Recommended free contest for published poetry books by residents of Canada's National Capital region (Ottawa) offers C$1,500. Send 4 copies of a book published during the preceding calendar year by a recognized publisher.

3/31: Mildred Kanterman Memorial Merit Book Awards +
Entries must be received by this date
Neutral free contest from the Haiku Society of America offers $500 for the best book of haiku, or primarily haiku, published in the previous calendar year. Books should be at least 24 pages. Early entries encouraged.

3/31: Naomi Long Madgett Poetry Award +
Entries must be received by this date
Neutral free contest for African-American poets offers $500 and publication for a poetry manuscript, 60-90 pages. Authors who have already had books published by Lotus Press are not eligible.

3/31: Ruth Lilly Poetry Fellowships +++
Entries must be received by this date
Highly recommended free contest from prestigious Poetry magazine offers five fellowships of $15,000 for US authors aged 21-31 as of the deadline. Upload 10 pages of poetry (published work may be included), introductory page, and list of published poems (optional) using their online submission manager. As of 2010, only online entries accepted.

3/31: Sarah Mook Memorial Poetry Prize for Students +
Neutral contest offers prizes up to $100 in four age categories for unpublished poems by students in grades K-12. Submit 1-3 poems, any length. Optional $5 entry fee will be donated to Smile Train, a charity that provides free cleft-palate surgery for poor children in developing nations. This contest is sponsored by David Mook in memory of his daughter, a young writer who died suddenly of an aortic aneurysm when she was in third grade.

3/31: Sunken Garden Poetry Festival's Young Poets Competition ++
Recommended free poetry contest for Connecticut high school students. Four to six winners will be published in a special-edition chapbook and be invited to read their poems during the "Night of Fresh Voices" in August at the Sunken Garden Poetry Festival at the Hill-Stead Museum. Send 1-5 pages of unpublished poetry and completed entry form by mail or email.

3/31: Toronto Book Awards +
Entries must be received by this date
Neutral free contest for published books of literary or artistic merit that are evocative of Toronto. C$15,000 will be awarded in all. Each shortlisted author (usually 4-6) receives C$1,000 and the winning author is awarded the remainder. There are no separate categories: novels, short story collections, books of poetry, biographies, histories, social studies, books about sports, children's books, photographic collections, etc. are judged together.


Login to The Best Free Poetry Contests now to view these and all our profiles of free contests. You can browse contests by deadline date, name, recommendation level, and more.

Key to Ratings
Highly Recommended: +++
Recommended: ++
Neutral: +

All deadlines are postmark deadlines unless otherwise specified.


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SPONSORS' MESSAGES


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FUNDSFORWRITERS — Grants, contests, markets and publishing calls for submissions. Over 35,000 readers. Chosen by Writer's Digest for its 101 Best Websites for Writers commendation for 2001-2010. Ten years of recognized excellence. www.fundsforwriters.com

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Last Call!
Tupelo Press Snowbound Chapbook Award
Postmark Deadline: February 28
The 11th Annual Snowbound Series Chapbook Award is an open competition with a prize of $1,000 and fifty copies. Submissions are accepted from anyone writing in the English language, whether living in the United States or abroad (translations are not eligible for this prize). The 2011 final judge will be Ellen Doré Watson. Prior winners include Mark Yakich, Joy Katz, Barbara Tran, John Cross, Stacey Waite, and Kathleen Jesme. All entries must be postmarked or uploaded to the online Submission Manager between December 1, 2010 and February 28, 2011. To submit your manuscript electronically and to see full guidelines, please visit our website:

http://www.tupelopress.org/snow.php

You may also send your manuscript via postal mail. Please include a $20 reading fee, payable to Tupelo Press, a self-addressed stamped envelope (SASE) for notification, as well as a self-addressed stamped postcard (SASP) if you would like acknowledgment that we received your manuscript. Manuscripts will not be returned. You may include an acknowledgments page listing previously published poems. Make sure that you include two cover pages. One with manuscript title, your name, address, phone number and email address. One with only manuscript title. Send your manuscript to:

     Tupelo Press
     Attn: Snowbound Chapbook Award
     P.O. Box 1767
     North Adams, MA 01247

Here is a poem from the lake has no saint (Tupelo Press, 2010) by Stacey Waite, past winner of the Snowbound Chapbook contest:
when you are thinking about the vineyard city as waiting
by Stacey Waite

no moon january. my lover, after taking her hand from my body, gives the death toll in
thailand. she is thinking again about the lost houses. her friend has given her beads for her
wrist. it's true i am lonely mostly in the mornings. sometimes i am thinking of something
else. for instance, in the afternoon, my mouth pressed into the pull of her body, i am
thinking of the still river in ohio, among the fallen trees, how i was ecstatic to touch her
breasts so close to the deer. some days we just have lunch. she buys me a sweater. cut hair.
the diligent day errands. there's no way to tell really. what we will need. what body will come
forward as if to say hear me I am not asking for anything.




Utmost Last Call!
Christian Poetry Contest Offers $3,000 in Cash Prizes
Postmark Deadline: February 28
The Utmost Christian Poetry Contest will pay cash prizes of US$3,000 to poets of Christian faith. First Prize: $1,000. Entry fee: $20 per poem. The Utmost Contest is celebrating its 10th anniversary this year. We're looking forward to rewarding your best poetry! Click for the complete contest rules. Utmost Christian Writers Foundation is a registered non-profit society for the encouragement and support of Christian poets.

Please enjoy "Simile at Starbucks", a winning entry from our first Utmost Contest in 2001:
Simile at Starbucks
by Marcia Lee Laycock

Like this paper cup
she was "60% post consumer
recycled fibre."

At the very least,
that much of her
had been used.

Too many hands
had cradled her, took
comfort from her inner
heat then crumpled her
away.

Too many lips had sought
her rim, lusting,
sucking all of her
innocence
into them, then leaving her
cold
as iced coffee.

Until the day
she was redeemed
stripped of past misuse
wrinkles ironed smooth
tears mended, stains
removed,
made new in
a final re cycle
made ready
to hold pure holy fire,
made utterly willing
to pour herself
out.




David Dodd Lee Last Call!
The Lester M. Wolfson Poetry Award
Postmark Deadline: March 1
The Lester M. Wolfson Poetry Award aims to bring fresh and original voices to the poetry reading public. The prize will be offered annually to any poet writing in English, including poets who have never published a full-length book as well as poets who have published several. New and Selected collections of poems are also welcome.

The winning poet will receive $1,000 and publication of his or her book. The winner will also be invited to give a reading at Indiana University South Bend as part of the release of the book. The final selection will be made by the Series Editor, David Dodd Lee. Current or former students or employees of Indiana University South Bend, as well as friends of the Series Editor, are not eligible for the prize.

There is a $25 non-refundable entry fee, payable to I.U. South Bend. There is no limit on the number of entries an author may submit. Simultaneous submissions are fine, in fact they are encouraged, just please withdraw your manuscript if it gets taken for publication elsewhere. Please include a SASE with each entry. Please include a self-addressed postage paid postcard if you desire confirmation of manuscript receipt. No manuscripts will be returned. Entries sent by email or fax are not permitted; they will be disqualified. On your cover sheet include name, address, phone number, and email. The manuscript should be paginated and include a table of contents and acknowledgments page.

Mail manuscripts to:

     Lester M. Wolfson Poetry Award
     Indiana University South Bend
     Department of English
     1700 Mishawaka Avenue
     P. O. Box 7111
     South Bend, IN 46634-7111

Manuscripts submitted for the Lester M. Wolfson Poetry Award should exhibit an awareness of the contemporary "voice" in American poetry, an awareness of our moment in time as poets. We are excited to receive poetry that is experimental as well as work of a more formalist bent, as long as it reflects a complexity and sophistication of thought and language. Urgency, yes; melodrama, not so much. Winners will be announced via this website, as well as through the mail. We will also announce the winner in major magazines (Poets & Writers) and blogs. The winning book, and any others chosen from the pool of entries, will be published in 2012. Questions? Please email Davdlee@iusb.edu.




The Poetry Cabin The Poetry Cabin Needs Your Help!
Pledge Deadline: March 1

For several years now, The Poetry Cabin at Green Valley Lake, CA has operated on a for-profit model. Now it is time to acknowledge that that experiment has proven unsuccessful. So owners Joanne and Charles Elliott—still intending to continue to put this good thing into our world—propose to make the cabin more helpful and accessible to many more poets, writers and artists by converting it to a nonprofit operation. This is to invite you to pledge to the fundraising campaign for this worthy project by March 1.

Under this plan, The Poetry Cabin in 2011 will invite poets, writers and artists to apply for free weekly or monthly use of this beautiful facility. The goal will be to donate this space for such uses at least two weeks per month.

We estimate $20,000 is needed to operate this program for one year, including cabin operating expenses, mailings and media outreach in such publications/websites as Poetry magazine, Poets & Writers, Writer's Digest, and American Poetry Review, and via The Poetry Cabin's existing Facebook page. Please help us to expand the service of The Poetry Cabin to the literary arts community!

Completely rebuilt and beautifully refurnished in 2008, The Poetry Cabin is a small cabin high in the San Bernardino National Forest, currently offered for rent for those who seek a quiet refuge in a mountain woodland setting to write and/or contemplate.

We ask you to send no money now, but to email your pledge to charleselliott2018@yahoo.com before the March 1 deadline. This project will only go forward if the full $20,000 can be raised. If it is not, The Poetry Cabin will close by the end of March.

If you donate to this literary cause, we will be pleased to thank you with the following gifts:
  • For $25 or more, a set of Poetry Cabin bookmarks and a certificate of appreciation
  • For $50 or more, a framed 4x6 photograph by Charles Elliott of various scenes around Green Valley Lake
  • For $100 or more, a copy of The Best American Poetry 2011: Series Editor David Lehman
  • For $500 or more, an 8x10 fine art photograph by Charles Elliott of sunset on Green Valley Lake, suitable for framing
  • For $1,000 or more, an invitation to spend a week at The Poetry Cabin for up to five guests (food and transportation not provided)
We hope to receive your pledge very soon!




upstreet Last Call!
upstreet
Submission period: September 1-March 1
upstreet, an award-winning literary annual, seeks quality submissions—with an edge—of short fiction, creative nonfiction, and poetry, for its seventh issue. The first six issues featured interviews with Jim Shepard, Lydia Davis, Wally Lamb, Michael Martone, Robin Hemley, and Sue William Silverman. Payment: author copy. Distribution: Ingram, Source Interlink, Ubiquity, and Disticor (Canada). For sample content and to submit, see www.upstreet-mag.org. For news about upstreet and its authors, visit www.upstreetfanclub.blogspot.com.

From upstreet number six:
Indian Pipe
by Robert Cording

Paramour of shadows, of the dark under
beech and oaks, it appears out of nowhere
on some gray nothing afternoon you fill in
with a walk: Ghost-Flower, Fairy Smoke.

As if fashioned out of snow or rime
in these rain-soaked first weeks of summer,
it raises itself all at once, suddenly here—
Ice-Plant—like some lost fact that passes
from memory back into life.

Indivisible from the ring of roots
it grows above, it reigns over the rich harvest
of understory rot, living by what lies buried.
Broker of the in-between, of what is and is not,
its affront to color, its scaly, waxen white
tilts the equilibrium of your summer self.

Picked, it blackens like a corpse.
And so it is forgotten until, here again,
its cool phallus reminds you of all
you do not wish to think about.



Bellingham Review Literary Awards Closing Next Month
Bellingham Review Literary Awards
Postmark Deadline: March 15
Three prizes of $1,000 each and publication in Bellingham Review are given annually for works of poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction. The 49th Parallel Poetry Award is given for a poem or group of poems of any style or length; Lia Purpura will judge. The Tobias Wolff Award for Fiction is given for a short story; Adrianne Harun will judge. The Annie Dillard Award for Creative Nonfiction is given for an essay; Ira Sukrungruang will judge.

Submit up to three poems or a story or essay of up to 9,000 words with an $18 entry fee ($10 for each additional entry), which includes a subscription to Bellingham Review. Send a self-addressed stamped envelope (SASE) or visit our website for complete guidelines. Christopher Carlson, Managing Editor.

Mail your submission and fee to:

     "[Contest Name]"
     Bellingham Review
     Cashier's Office
     Mail Stop 9004 - Old Main 245
     Western Washington University
     Bellingham, WA 98225-9053

Please enjoy "All Alien Spirits Rest the Spirit", winner of the 49th Parallel Poetry Award in 2009:
All Alien Spirits Rest the Spirit
by Elizabeth McLagan

There are rocks that have forgotten the body:
orphaned, smoothed by their journey, tossed up

at random and left to dry in the sun. The river
retreats into its own life beyond the marsh

where deer graze by the secret ponds of geese.
Hard midday light on the surface of water,

Click for the full poem



Westmoreland Arts & Heritage Festival Closing Next Month
Westmoreland Arts & Heritage Festival Poetry & Short Story Contest
Postmark Deadline: March 15
The Westmoreland Arts & Heritage Festival is currently accepting previously unpublished poetry and short story manuscripts for its 2011 Poetry & Short Story Contest. The contest is open to any living writer writing in English anywhere in the world. Entries will be juried by accomplished writers and poets. Two jurors will be selected. One juror is chosen to evaluate the poetry entries and a second juror is selected to jury the short story entries.

The 37th Annual Westmoreland Arts & Heritage Festival takes place July 1-4, 2011 at Twin Lakes Park, near Greensburg, PA. Winning entries will be on display at the Festival where up to 150,000 patrons will have the opportunity to read the works.

All work must be original, not having been entered in any previous Poetry & Short Story Contest sponsored by the Westmoreland Arts & Heritage Festival. There is no limit to the length of poems. Each author may enter one story; each poet may enter two poems. All genres are accepted. Awards for both contests total $1,000.

Entry fees are as follows:
  • $10 for up to two (2) poems
  • $10 for one (1) short story
  • Writers may enter both contests for a $20 entry fee
Please direct any questions to Adam J. Shaffer via email at info@ArtsAndHeritage.com or by calling 724-834-7474. For more information, visit the Westmoreland Arts & Heritage Festival website, www.ArtsAndHeritage.com. For an official application form, please see http://www.artsandheritage.com/Downloads/poetry_and_short_stories_2011_web.pdf




Fish Publishing

Closing Next Month
Brian Turner, judge of the Fish Poetry Prize 2011 FISH POETRY PRIZE 2011
Entries must be received by March 30

Judge: Brian Turner, author of Here, Bullet and Phantom Noise
First Prize: 1,000 euros
The ten best poems will be published in the 2011 Fish Anthology, and the poets will receive five free copies.

Entry fee: 14 euros per poem when submitted online at www.fishpublishing.com, or 16 euros per poem when submitted by mail (instructions below). A critique is available for an additional 30 euros per poem.

General Guidelines
  • The poetry contest is open to poets of any nationality writing in English
  • Each poem is restricted to 200 words or less
  • There is no restriction on theme or style
  • The winning poems must be available for the anthology and, therefore, must not have been published previously
  • Copyright returns to the poet one year after publication of the anthology. Entry is taken to be acceptance of these rules
  • Results will be published on April 30, 2011
Entering by Mail
To enter by mail, please include your entry fee and story in the same envelope. Do not put your name or address on the poem—put all contact details on a separate sheet. Checks payable to Fish Publishing. NOTE: Checks must be made out in the currency of the country from which they are sent, to the value of the fee. We will acknowledge receipt of entry by email only. Poems will not be returned. Critiques will be transmitted by email unless requested to be sent by mail. Mail your submissions to: The Fish Poetry Contest, Fish Publishing, Durrus, Bantry, Co Cork, Ireland.

Full details of the competition and previous anthologies are online at www.fishpublishing.com along with the Fish One-Page Prize, and a great online Flash Fiction Writing Course. Questions? Please email info@fishpublishing.com.





Writecorner Press Writecorner Press Poetry Prize
Postmark Deadline: March 31
First Place $500; Editors' Choices, $100.
Seeks the best unpublished poems of 40 lines and under. Any style, any theme. Send 2 copies of each poem, with author's name, address, phone, short bio, and email address on only one copy. Make other copy anonymous. Fee: $5 first poem, $3 each additional poem, payable to Writecorner Press. Read the complete guidelines. Read past winners.

E.M. Koeppel Short Fiction Contest
Postmark Deadline: April 30
First Place $1,100; Editors' Choices, $100. Seeks unpublished stories, 3,000 words maximum. Any style, any theme. $15 fee for one story, $10 each additional story, payable to Writecorner Press. Send one title page with author's name, address, phone, email address, and short bio. Send second title page with title only. Read the complete guidelines. Read past winners.

Writecorner Press judges all submissions anonymously. Winning poems and stories will be published on our literary site, www.writecorner.com. After publication, writers retain all rights. No email entries, please. Fees are used to pay awards and site expenses. Read the contest guidelines, then mail your submissions to Writecorner Press Contests, P.O. Box 140310, Gainesville, FL 32614.

Please enjoy this excerpt from "The Once and Missing Captain of Commerce" by Rodney Nelsestuen, winner of our 2010 E. M. Koeppel Short Fiction Award.
The line at Old Country Buffet was unusually long for a Wednesday before noon and Elaine's hope of beating the crowd had been dashed by the dozen people in front of them. She craned her neck around, twisted it painfully against arthritic vertebrae, looked up and studied Paul's face as it loomed over the top of her head. The left side of his neck was covered with stubble which meant he'd held the electric razor in his right hand and swept it back and forth, up and down, along the same path for the ten minutes she'd left him alone this morning. But Paul was quiet, seemed at peace and gazed off toward the short meat buffet where a dark skinned man in a chef's hat sliced him thin shavings of prime rib from a giant slab.

She blinked and again looked up at his neck. There was something distinguished in the salt and pepper stubble that crossed his face here and there. It reminded her of the stubble on his father's face as he lay in his bed those final three days of his life, days that remained vivid but would, next March, mark a decade since his passing. Her husband had had such plans for Paul. Elaine had four prior miscarriages when the doctor told them, in the inexact science of the day, that he thought it was a boy and that he was "cautiously optimistic" about Elaine's ability to bring him to term. The two would-be parents dipped into the rainy day fund that night and went out to dinner. A tall man nearly six-six, Everett was powerfully built and brilliant, but uneducated and held back from the promotions he so coveted. He'd spent most of his career buried in the backroom of a global corporation, embarrassed to be the only man in the third floor accounting pool—never mind the added insult his height provided in making him so conspicuous. Paul would be the vindication of his failings. That had been clear to Elaine from the night they went to dinner. And she often wondered if it was then, when she felt the weight of Everett's expectations on her yet unborn son that things first began to go wrong. She was much younger than Everett. Barely 20 years old when pregnant with Paul and unnerved by miscarriages and prenatal science. Had she worried Paul into his state? Had she tried too hard to keep him inside her, rested so much those first four months when maybe God or nature could have taken him from her and none of their coming tribulations would have been realized?

Click for the full story



2011 FutureCycle Poetry Book Prize





Tupelo Press First/Second Book Award12th Annual Tupelo Press Award for a First or Second Book of Poetry
Postmark Deadline: April 15

The 12th Annual Tupelo Press Award for a First or Second Book of Poetry is an open competition with a $3,000 prize. Submissions are accepted from anyone writing in the English language, whether living in the United States or abroad (translations are not eligible for this prize). Final judges are to be announced. Prior winners include Jennifer Michael Hecht, Aimee Nezhukumatathil, Bill Van Every, Kristin Bock, and Jennifer Militello. All entries must be postmarked or uploaded to the online Submission Manager between January 1 and April 15, 2011. To submit your manuscript electronically and to see full guidelines, please visit our website:

http://www.tupelopress.org/first.php

You may also send your manuscript via postal mail. Please include a $25 reading fee, payable to Tupelo Press, a self-addressed stamped envelope (SASE) for notification, as well as a self-addressed stamped postcard (SASP) if you would like acknowledgment that we received your manuscript. Manuscripts will not be returned. You may include an acknowledgments page listing previously published poems. Make sure that you include two cover pages. One with manuscript title, your name, address, phone number and email address. One with only manuscript title. Send your manuscript to:

     Tupelo Press
     Attn: First/Second Book Award
     P.O. Box 1767
     North Adams, MA 01247




Tiferet Writing Contest 2011




The Writer's Digest 80th Annual Writing Competition The Writer's Digest 80th Annual Writing Competition
Postmark Deadline: May 2

For 80 years, the Annual Writer's Digest Competition has rewarded writers just like you for their finest work. We continue the tradition by giving away more than $30,000 in cash and prizes!

Win a trip to the Writer's Digest Conference in New York City!

Grand Prize: $3,000 cash and a trip to the Writer's Digest Conference in New York City to meet with editors and agents. While you are there a Writer's Digest editor will arrange for you to meet with four editors or agents!

First Place: The First-Place Winner in each category receives $1,000 cash and $100 worth of Writer's Digest Books.

Second Place: The Second-Place Winner in each category receives $500 cash, plus $100 worth of Writer's Digest Books.

Third Place: The Third-Place Winner in each category receives $250 cash, plus $100 worth of Writer's Digest Books.

Fourth Place: The Fourth-Place Winner in each category receives $100 cash, plus $50 worth of Writer's Digest Books.

Fifth Place: The Fifth-Place Winner in each category receives $50 cash.

Sixth through Tenth Place: The Sixth- through Tenth-Place Winners in each category receive $25 cash.

First- through Tenth-Place Winners also receive a 1-year Writer's Digest VIP membership, which includes a one-year subscription (new or renewal) to Writer's Digest Magazine, 1-year access to WritersMarket.com, 10% off Writer's Digest University workshops and purchases at WritersDigestShop.com and more.

11th through 100th Place: All other winners receive distinctive certificates honoring their accomplishment. Visit http://writersdigest.com/annual for complete guidelines and to enter online.




Dancing Poetry Festival
Artists Embassy International Poetry Contest - Three Grand Prize Winning Poems to be Danced and Filmed
Postmark Deadline: May 15

  • 3 Grand Prizes will receive $100 each plus their poems will be danced and filmed. Each Grand Prize winner will be invited onstage for photo ops with the dancers and a bow in the limelight.
  • 6 First Prizes will receive $50 each
  • 12 Second Prizes will receive $25 each
  • 30 Third Prizes will receive $10 each
All prize winners will receive a prize certificate suitable for framing and a ticket to the Dancing Poetry Festival 2011, and be invited to read their prizewinning poem at our 18th Festival at the California Palace of the Legion of Honor in San Francisco (September 24, 2011, Noon-4pm). The top three poems chosen as Grand Prizes will be choreographed, costumed and recorded live in an on-stage performance at the Festival. See pictures from our 2010 Festival. Dancing Poetry Festival

Last year's Grand Prize winners included Ana Elsner, Art Schwartz and Pat Tompkins. Recent topics of winning poems have touched on the travels of Matisse, a Picasso painting, falling leaves, love, Iraq, China, history, dance, current events, reverie, socially significant situations and even some humor sprinkled here and there. Please don't feel constrained to write a poem about dancing.

The entry fee is $5 per poem or $10 for 3 poems. Each poem may be up to 40 lines long. Send two copies of each poem. One copy should be anonymous (just title and poem), the other should have your name, address, phone, email address and where you heard about this contest (e.g. Winning Writers Newsletter). There is no limit on the number of entries. Entries should be typed.

When the judges evaluate entries, they look for innovative perspectives on ordinary or unusual subjects as well as excellence of craft. Your entry should be suitable for a general audience since our following is comprised of people of all ages and ethnicities. English translations must be included with non-English poems. Dancing Poetry Contest

Our judges consist of poets, dancers, musicians and visual artists of various media, all members of Artists Embassy International. Judging is done with the anonymous copies of the poems. Artists Embassy International is a non-profit, volunteer, arts and education organization whose goal is to further intercultural understanding through the arts.

Three poets, the Grand Prize winners, will be rewarded with seeing their poems danced by Natica Angilly's Poetic Dance Theater Company, a well-known dance troupe that has performed around the world and throughout America. This company is dedicated exclusively to creating new avenues by combining poetry, dance and music together for presentation and the expansion of poetry with dance in the life of our culture.

To enter the contest, please visit our website at www.dancingpoetry.com or submit to AEI Contest Chair W, Judy Cheung, 704 Brigham Avenue, Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Questions? Please email Ms. Cheung at jhcheung@comcast.net.




Anderbo 2011 Anderbo Creative Nonfiction Prize
Postmark Deadline: June 15
  • Submit one entry, up to 1,500 words
  • Winner receives $500 cash and publication on anderbo.com
  • Judged by Elizabeth Wurtzel, assisted by Emma Stockman
Guidelines:
  • The creative nonfiction piece should be typed on 8 1/2" x 11" paper with the writer's name and contact information on the upper right corner of the first page, and the writer's name on every page
  • Writer must not have been previously published on anderbo.com
  • Mail submissions to:
         Anderbo Creative Nonfiction Prize
         270 Lafayette Street, Suite 1412
         New York, NY 10012
  • Enclose self-addressed stamped business envelope (SASE) to receive names of winner and honorable mentions
  • All entries are non-returnable and will be recycled
  • Reading fee is $10. Check or money order payable to RRofihe
  • See the complete guidelines at http://www.anderbo.com/anderbo1/andernonfictionprize2011.html
Elizabeth Lee Wurtzel, an American writer and journalist, is a graduate of Harvard College and Yale Law School. She published her groundbreaking memoir of depression, the cultural phenomenon Prozac Nation, at the tender age of 26. Already a cultural critic and literary light for The New Yorker and New York magazines, Elizabeth Wurtzel had only dared to dream when growing up of the rarefied world and success Prozac Nation opened to her. Yet, no success could staunch her continuous battle with depression. Following the success of Prozac Nation, Elizabeth Wurtzel published Bitch, and after a stint in rehab, released More, Now, Again about her battle with drugs and how she overcame her addictions. She has since published two other books, The Bitch Rules, and The Secret of Life: Commonsense Advice for the Uncommon Woman. Currently she practices law and writes regularly on current culture for TheAtlanticWire.com.




PhatSalmon Poetry Contest




Robert Frost Foundation
15th Annual Robert Frost Foundation Annual Poetry Award
Postmark/Email Submission Deadline: September 15 (don't enter before March 1)
The Robert Frost Foundation welcomes poems in the spirit of Robert Frost for its 15th Annual Award. The winner will receive $1,000 and an invitation to present the winning poem this fall at the Frost Festival located at the Lawrence Public Library in Lawrence, Massachusetts, the library in which Frost first explored the traditions of English and Irish poetry.

Please submit two copies of each poem, one copy with contact information (name, address, phone number, email address) and one copy free of all identifying information. Reading fees are $10 per poem (send fees via regular mail, please). Make your check payable to The Robert Frost Foundation. Mail your entry to: The Robert Frost Foundation, Attn: Poetry Award, Lawrence Public Library - 3rd Floor, 51 Lawrence Street, Lawrence, MA 01841. Include a self-addressed stamped envelope (SASE) or an email address if you'd like to receive the contest results. Email submissions are accepted at frostfoundation@comcast.net if you send your entry fee by regular mail.

You may submit up to three poems of no more than three pages each. Both published and unpublished works are accepted. See the complete contest guidelines at www.frostfoundation.org and more on recent winners.

Please enjoy "The Pond" by Sarah Sousa, a finalist in our 2010 competition.
The Pond
by Sarah Sousa

While digging the pond
he found three grave markers
and drove around them.
Now the pond has a kidney
shape he never intended.
Early on, he shot a snapping turtle
through the shell because he heard
they eat ducklings.
The shell, a piece of boot
leather that sprung an ugly
black hole, blown out
around the edges. He wonders
sometimes what the payment is
for killing a creature with double
the lifespan, that life double-
knotted to creation myth.
A snapper can live forty years,
as the mercury drops
to the bottom of the bulb
and his blood slows
and he embeds himself
like a lozenge of amber
in the silt of the pond.
A duck can hope for twelve.


Open City's 2011 RRofihe Trophy Short Story ContestOpen City's 2011 RRofihe Trophy Short Story Contest
Postmark Deadline: October 15
8th year! The RRofihe Trophy for an unpublished short story! Limit: 5,000 words. Winner receives: $500, trophy, and publication in Open City magazine. Judge: Rick Rofihe, assisted by Carolyn Wilsey.

Guidelines:
  • Stories should be typed, double-spaced, on 8 1/2" x 11" paper with the author's name and contact information on the first page and name and story title on the upper right corner of the remaining pages
  • Limit one submission per author
  • Author must not have been previously published in Open City
  • Mail submissions to:
         RRofihe
         270 Lafayette Street, Suite 1412
         New York, NY 10012
  • Enclose a self-addressed stamped business envelope (SASE) to receive names of winner and honorable mentions
  • All manuscripts are non-returnable and will be recycled
  • Reading fee is $10. Check or money order payable to RRofihe
  • See the complete guidelines at http://opencity.org/the-rrofihe-trophy
Rick Rofihe is the author of FATHER MUST, a collection of short stories published by Farrar, Straus & Giroux. His fiction has appeared in The New Yorker, Grand Street, Open City, Swink, Unsaid, and on epiphanyzine, slushpilemag and fictionaut. His nonfiction has appeared in The New York Times, The Village Voice, SPY, and The East Hampton Star, and on mrbellersneighborhood. A recipient of the Whiting Writers' Award, he has taught MFA writing at Columbia University. He currently teaches privately in New York City, and is an advisor to The Vilcek Foundation for their 2011 prizes in the field of literature. Rick is the editor of the new online literary journal, anderbo.com.


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SELECTED FREE PROSE CONTESTS

These free prose contests with deadlines between February 16 and March 31 are included as a bonus in The Best Free Poetry Contests.

Click the contest names below to go straight to their profiles, or login to The Best Free Poetry Contests here. After you login, please click the Find Free Contests link, then search by Prose Contest Type to find prose contests.

2/20: Dream Deferred Essay Contest ++
Entries must be received by this date; formerly February 21
Recommended free contest offers prizes up to $2,000 for essays, 600-1,500 words, on the struggle for civil rights in Middle Eastern countries. Open to authors living in the US, Arab League member states, Iran or Afghanistan, aged 25 or under. Enter via online form. Sponsor HAMSA is an initiative of the American Islamic Congress.

2/25: Frances Lincoln Diverse Voices Children's Book Award ++
Entries must be received by this date
Recommended free contest offers 1,500 pounds and possible publication for an unpublished novel for children aged 8-12 that celebrates cultural diversity. Entrants should be aged 16+ with no prior published novels for children. Manuscripts should be 15,000-35,000 words. See website for entry form and more details on the contest theme. Enter by mail or email.

2/25: Judith Siegel Pearson Award +
Entries must be received by this date; formerly February 26
Neutral free contest offers annual awards averaging $250 for the best creative or scholarly work on a subject concerning women. Award categories rotate each year. Fiction will be the genre of choice in 2011, drama in 2012, poetry in 2013, and essays in 2014. Prose and drama length limit is 20 double-spaced pages, poetry 4-10 poems (maximum 20 pages).

2/28: Charles Johnson Student Fiction Award +++
Highly recommended free contest for US college and graduate students offers $1,000 and publication in Crab Orchard Review for a short story, maximum 20 double-spaced pages. The award competition is open to all undergraduate and graduate students who are US citizens or permanent residents currently enrolled full- or part-time in a US college or university.

2/28: Kenyon Review Short Fiction Contest +++
Entries must be received by this date
Highly recommended free contest for authors aged 30 and under. Prize is tuition to The Kenyon Review's one-week summer seminar and publication in the highly prestigious journal. Submit one story, 1,200 words maximum, via their online form. No simultaneous submissions.

3/1: Commonwealth Short Story Competition +++
Entries must be received by this date; formerly March 31
Highly recommended free contest for citizens of the British Commonwealth (the UK and countries once ruled by the British Empire) offers up to 2,000 pounds and radio broadcast for a short story, maximum 600 words, as well as special prizes of 500 pounds each for children's short stories and stories on the 2011 theme "Women as Agents of Change". One entry per person. Entries must be made by email. As of 2011, the contest is sponsored by the Commonwealth Foundation. Enter online only.

3/1: Harold U. Ribalow Prize ++
Entries must be received by this date
Recommended free contest offers $3,000 for a published book of fiction on Jewish themes. Publishers should submit 3 copies of an English-language book published in the previous calendar year. Three copies should be sent to Hadassah Magazine's NYC office. Early entries strongly encouraged. Email Andrew Basedow with questions.

3/1: John Gardner Fiction Book Award ++
Entries must be received by this date
Recommended free contest from Binghamton University offers $1,000 for the best book of fiction published in the previous calendar year, minimum press run 500. Publishers should send 3 copies of published book (no galleys) plus application form.

3/1: Keep the Drive High School Journalism Awards ++
Entries must be received by this date; formerly March 20
Recommended free contest for US high school students offers prizes up to $2,000 in two categories, print and broadcast journalism, for an article or video about promoting safe driving habits among teens. Entries must have been first published or broadcast in the entrant's high school. Enter by mail or online. Contest sponsor The Allstate Foundation is a charitable organization funded by contributions from the Allstate insurance company.

3/1: Lambda Literary Foundation Outstanding Mid-Career Novelist Prize ++
Recommended free contest offers two prizes of $5,000, one to a self-identified man and one to a self-identified woman, for GLBT authors who have published at least three novels, or two novels and substantial additional literary work such as poetry, short stories, or essays. Candidates' contributions to the LGBT literary field beyond their writings and publications will also be considered. Submit a list of published works, recommendations, and a letter of nomination. Individuals may nominate themselves or other writers.

3/1: Stony Brook Short Fiction Prize ++
Recommended free contest for college students in the US and Canada offers $1,000, online publication and a scholarship to the Stony Brook Southampton Writing Conference. Send one story, maximum 7,500 words, and proof of current enrollment for the academic year in which the deadline falls. Asian students especially encouraged to enter. Sponsored by SUNY-Stony Brook.

3/1: Student Travel Writing Contest +
Entries must be received by this date
Neutral free contest offers prizes up to $500 and publication on TransitionsAbroad.com for travel essays, 1,000-2,000 words, on an annual theme. Currently enrolled undergraduate and graduate students, students who have graduated within the past year, and students currently on leave from school are eligible. Enter online only. Photo illustrations are encouraged.

3/1: Susan Sontag Prize for Translation ++
Entries must be received by this date; formerly February 13
Recommended free contest offers a $5,000 fellowship for a translation project by applicants under the age of 30. The 2011 prize is for English translations of a novella, a play, a collection of short stories or poems, or a collection of letters originally written in Italian. Applications available on website; materials should include personal statement, 5-page sample translation accompanied by the same passage in the original language, project proposal, bio, academic transcript, and letter of recommendation.

3/7: William Saroyan Story Writing Contest for Students +
Entries must be received by this date; formerly March 8
Neutral free contest sponsored by the William Saroyan Society offers prizes of $100, $75 and $50 for the top three stories by students in each of the following age divisions: grades 1-2, grades 3-4, grades 5-6, grades 7-9, grades 10-12 and college. Maximum 2 double-spaced pages per story. Theme for 2011 is: "Which friend or family member has had the greatest impact on your life? Why?" Special needs students encouraged to submit.

3/15: Waterman Fund Alpine Essay Contest ++
Recommended free contest offers top prize of $1,500 and publication in Appalachia Journal for essays of 2,500-4,000 words that explore the relationship between the human spirit and the environment. Both personal and scholarly works are welcome. Contest is open to US residents who have not published a book or a national magazine article on the topic. Enter by mail or online. No simultaneous submissions. The Waterman Fund supports education and stewardship to preserve the Alpine areas of the Northeastern US.

3/18: It's All Write Short Story Writing Contest for Teens +
Entries must be received by this date; formerly March 19
Neutral free contest for short fiction by middle and high school students offers prizes up to $250 in each age category: grades 6-8, 9-10, and 11-12. Send one story, 4-8 pages (with line spacing set to 1.5), by email.

3/20: Anthem Essay Contest for High School Students +++
Highly recommended free contest for 8th, 9th and 10th graders offers top prize of $2,000, other large prizes, for essays on Ayn Rand's novella Anthem. See website for essay topics and background on Rand's rationalist, libertarian worldview. Length limit is 600-1,200 words. Enter by mail or online.

3/21: Glass Woman Prize ++
Entries must be received by this date; late submissions held for the next contest
Recommended twice-yearly free contest offers prizes up to $500 and online publication for the best short fiction or creative nonfiction by women. Both published and unpublished work welcome. Entries should be 50-5,000 words. Contest sponsor Beate Sigriddaughter says, "Subject is open, but must be of significance to women. My criterion is passion, excellence, and authenticity in the woman's writing voice." Enter by email (no attachments).

3/31: Bevel Summers Prize in the Short Short Story ++
Entries must be received by this date
Recommended free contest for short fiction up to 1,000 words offers $250 and publication in the online version of Shenandoah, the prestigious literary journal of Washington & Lee University.

3/31: Eric Hoffer Award for Short Prose +
Entries must be received by this date
Neutral free contest from Hopewell Publications offers $500 and anthology publication for short fiction or essays (both genres compete together) up to 10,000 words. Enter online only. No simultaneous submissions. Deadlines are quarterly, but there is only one annual prize. You can enter one story per quarter. Enter by email only.

3/31: L. Ron Hubbard's Writers of the Future Contest +++
Highly recommended free contest for emerging writers of short science fiction, fantasy and horror offers quarterly prizes of $1,000 plus an annual $5,000 grand prize for one of the four winners. Send only one story per quarter, maximum 17,000 words. See website for eligibility rules. Entrants may not have professionally published a novel or short novel, or more than one novelette, or more than three short stories, in any medium.

3/31: Sylvia K. Burack Award ++
Formerly March 1
Recommended free contest for personal essays by 11th and 12th grade students in the US or Canada. Prize is $500 and publication in The Writer, a monthly magazine with advice and markets for creative writers. Submit a 600- to 800-word personal essay in English on the theme of a "work of fiction, poem or play that has influenced you. Discuss the work and explain how it affected you."


Login to The Best Free Poetry Contests now to view these and all our profiles of free contests.

Key to Ratings
Highly Recommended: +++
Recommended: ++
Neutral: +

All deadlines are postmark deadlines unless otherwise specified.


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CALLS FOR SUBMISSIONS

Contemporary Verse 2
Postmark Deadline: March 1
CV2, a Canadian literary journal of cutting-edge poetry and criticism, seeks submissions for their Summer 2011 issue on the impact of the Internet on poetry, to be titled "Online Imagination". See website for length limits for each genre. No simultaneous submissions. Email entries accepted from Canadians only. CV2 is a paying market.

moonShine Review
Postmark Deadline: March 1
moonShine review publishes original, previously unpublished works of short fiction, flash fiction, and creative nonfiction. Preference is given to artists from Charlotte, NC, and the Southeast. Submit 1-4 prose pieces, maximum 3,500 words each (under 2,500 words is preferred). See website for formatting guidelines. Photography submissions are also accepted.

Rain and Thunder
Postmark Deadlines: March 1 (disability issue), June 1 (open-theme issue)
Rain and Thunder, a radical feminist journal, seeks poetry, artwork, and essays by women for two upcoming issues. For the disability issue, they are interested in the following themes: "How do women define and experience disability? How does ableism and disability oppression affect our lives? How does disability intersect with and inform other social/political identities and struggles? What is radical feminist disability activism and organizing? How do we work towards disability justice within our society and more specifically within our social justice communities? How can disabled and non-disabled feminists work in solidarity?" The open-theme issue is open to all varieties of creative and political radical feminist writings as well as photos, collages, poems, chants and more.

Bridport Prize Flash Film Competition
Entries must be received by March 20
Choose one of five prizewinning flash fiction stories from the UK's prestigious Bridport Prize, create a 60-second film based on the story, and upload it to their Vimeo site. The five top films will be shown at the Bridport Film Festival in April, and one winner will receive a cash prize. Fee is 5 pounds. Enter online.

Tin House
Postmark Deadline: April 1
The well-regarded literary journal Tin House is seeking submissions of poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction for two upcoming theme issues: "The Ecstatic" (Fall 2011) and "Beauty" (Winter 2011). See details on website. Send one prose piece, maximum 10,000 words, or 1-5 poems.

Topside Press
Entries must be received by August 31
Launched in 2011 in Brooklyn, Topside Press is interested in literature by and about transgender people. For their debut project, they are seeking short stories up to 10,000 words for an anthology of literary fiction by transgender authors and/or with transgender protagonists. Editors Tom Leger and Riley MacLeod co-produced the STAGES Transgender Theatre Festival in 2003 and have written short films and musical comedy.


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FEATURED POEMS FROM OUR SUBSCRIBERS

Praise Poem
by Stephen Derwent Partington

We praise the man who,
though he held the match between
his finger and his thumb,
beheld the terror of its tiny drop of phosphorus,
its brown and globoid smoothness
like a charred and tiny skull
and so returned it to its box.

So too, we hail the youth who,
though he took his panga on the march,
perceived it odd within his fist
when there was neither scrub
nor firewood to be felled,
so laid it down.

An acclamation for the man who,
though he saw the woman running, clothing torn,
and though he lusted,
saw his mother in her youth,
restrained his colleagues
and withdrew.

We pay our homage to the man who,
though his heart was like a stone
and though he took a stone to cast,
could feel its hardness in the softness of his palm
and grasped the brittleness of bone,
so let it drop.

We laud the man who,
though he snatched to scrutinise
the passenger's I.D.,
saw not the name—instead, the face—
and slid it back
as any friend might slide his hand to shake a friend's.

And to the rest of us,
a blessing:
may you never have to be that man,
but if you have to,
BE!


Copyright 2011 by Stephen Derwent Partington

This poem is reprinted from his collection How to Euthanise a Cactus (Cinnamon Press, 2010).


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News of The Nameless
by Veronica Golos

     *

I climb marble steps worn to the shapes of waves.
I follow those with the loudest voices.

I am a dry broom
an old man sweeps his floor with; the sunlight speaks in Braille.

All Bethlehem is a child's tale: the crisis-crossed road,
the man in the white robe, the donkey,

the already dangerous dust.
Now the news is full of splinters.

Graffiti scars my palms, my wrists—
I walk through the library of forgetting.

I am my own news and nothing's
good.

     *

Who was he, naked and bound on the ground?
He is gone now.

Disappeared into the crowd of other news,
disappeared into someone's home,

where he sits, hands flat on the table—
pierced by a brilliant sun.

Where is the solider, the helmet, the hands, the threat
that pulled him naked from his cell

held him
as the choker clicked like a timepiece?

Who carries the dead weight, the iron cuffs,
the chair in the center of the room,

the whisper behind the earlobe?
I hear particulates strung along air, vibrating:

What is his name?
What is his name?



Copyright 2011 by Veronica Golos

This poem is reprinted from her collection Vocabulary of Silence, which was released in February 2011 by Red Hen Press.


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Their Tranquil Lives
by Kathleen Spivack

Oh lost world of Gustav Klimt,
the jeweled and doe-eyed women swam the walls and ceilings
of pre-Holocaust Vienna's
ornate opera. Women's compliance
did not need to be stated,
was pink and white
and not hidden by drapes.

World War I had not yet happened.
The city was a beaker spilling over
with bits of gold applied
which one could drink
or pour into, carefully
lavish and lucky.

Outside the window apples
shone in their dappled garden.
The women had proud
names, and pregnancies.
They rose like mermaids through
their tranquil lives,
upward and passionate.
The insides of their wrists
were white and still unmarked,
smoothed with kisses:

Vienna before History—
Each morning was a waking: pond
drenched in light; the path,
perfumed with little flowers, stitched
white butterflies and the painter-god
creating first-words; a mosaic
of forbidden.

As if memory
would tapestry forever
voyeur-painter's studios, light-
drenched: the livid golden hair
and modeled arms and bracelets lifting:
perfect breasts; rounded nutcracker
thighs and, ready for the
taking, the ripe fruit.

As if the comet,
pleasure, would never
burn itself to ash; the dross,
once-glorious color
seeping, leaching, thinly
staining Europe.
Oh much punished and
lost worlds of Gustav
Klimt, while you stroked
undertone rose-ochre tints
to flesh, your century,
demented, waited
for its urgent re-inventions;
voice-over, take-over
newsreel/newsprint narratives:
blunt black-and-white.


Copyright 2010 by Kathleen Spivack

This poem was the co-winner of the 2010 Allen Ginsberg Poetry Award from the Poetry Center at Passaic County Community College and was published in The Paterson Literary Review.


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The Sandpile at Eleven
by John Alexanderson

Bricks with moss on sand to make a town
wood block busses move up and down its streets.
Crouch, intent, make traffic sounds
     Since twelve soon turns   let no one see

 the last season that matters
we wedge baseball cards in our capbrims
practice as professionals might   aim a chance
to reach the Bigs when we are men
it seems Mom boards the City bus at least twice a week
plans a Real Fifth Avenue wedding

 my lovely sister marries   our Princess Grace
an Ocean Liner fails in the North Atlantic   it becomes the year in headlines

Mom's paid her fare by now   slip the side door   cross the stones and grass
a flattened sand pile   castoff bricks   worn blocks of wood
the Final year for   my city   I never even stopped to think

chipped Bricks on end in sand pretend the past –
streets imagined weave – wood block busses move
in – out the grid   Crouch – intent – mimic exhaust and brakes.
infinity – unfolds – recedes
Twelve approaches   alone   on ragged dirty knees.


Copyright 2010 by John Alexanderson

This poem won first prize in the 2010 Portland Pen Poetry Contest from the National League of American Pen Women.

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PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT

The Origins of ProLiteracy

In 2002, Laubach Literacy International and Literacy Volunteers of America, Inc. merged to form ProLiteracy.

Laubach Literacy International's history begins in 1930, when Dr. Frank C. Laubach was a missionary among the Maranao people of the Philippines. His concern about their poor living conditions led him to conclude that the ability to read and write was essential for them to begin to solve their problems. As the Maranaos learned to read, they would, in turn, teach other adults on a one-to-one basis that became known as "Each One, Teach One". From 1935 to 1967, Dr. Laubach visited 105 countries answering calls for literacy help and created reading lessons in 315 languages. He founded Laubach Literacy International in Syracuse, NY, in 1955.

For years, literacy as a global mission interested Ruth J. Colvin. She had heard Dr. Laubach speak about illiteracy in faraway countries, but she didn't consider it a problem in America. So she was shocked when she read a 1961 Syracuse Post-Standard newspaper article that stated there were over 11,000 people in her county who could not read or write well (based on 1960 U.S. Census figures). She began speaking with local social service agencies, community leaders, and church groups about the problem. With the help of reading experts, she developed a means to train volunteers to tutor adults. In 1962, she started Literacy Volunteers of America, Inc.

Dr. Laubach's son, Dr. Robert Laubach, was born in Manila, Philippines. When Dr. Bob, as he now likes to be called, was in high school there, he learned to set type and run the printing press that produced reading material for people in the literacy program. Dr. Bob went on to create a literacy journalism program at Syracuse University. Out of that work, he started New Readers Press in 1967, which publishes instructional materials for adult new readers and their teachers.

Click to learn more about these pioneers in adult literacy.

ProLiteracy WorldwideProLiteracy supports adults and young people in the U.S. and internationally who are learning to read, write, and do basic math by training instructors, publishing instructional materials, and advocating for resources and public policies that support them.

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Jendi Reiter JENDI'S CRITIQUE CORNER

This month, Critique Corner is pleased to present "Jubilate Agno" by Jack Goodman. (Tracy Koretsky will return as the author of Critique Corner in March.)

If you would like a chance to be critiqued, please email your poem to critique@winningwriters.com. Send the poem in the body of your email message (no attachments) and put "poetry critique" in the subject line. One submission per poet per month. Thanks!

Jubilate Agno
by Jack Goodman

Like a black kite
from another dimension,
God appears
circling above
the dying lamb—
unhurried hunger
weaving through
an ordinary sky—
His poisoned eyes
reflecting the knowledge
that his flesh
will become
His flesh,
his blood
His blood.
Sweeping down
in an ever decreasing
vortex,
black wings
shrouding the sun,
He steps down
from His throne of air.

Carrion eater,
tearer of flesh,
purifier,
His terrible
skull red
from holding
back the sun—
shit-stained
legs and feet
clawing the earth
in time's shadow,
patient, waiting,
His skeletal breath
stinks of centuries
of rotting meat.

After an exploratory
peck or two
He grunts, hisses,
then starts with the eyes,
as He promises
Paradise.


Copyright 2011 by Jack Goodman



Critique by Jendi Reiter

There's something about Christianity and gothic horror that seems to go together, as we see in "Jubilate Agno" by Jack Goodman, a poet from Twin Falls, Idaho. Many of our classic fright-fest plots could be seen as variations on Christian imagery, but with God's goodness and trustworthiness removed from the picture. Compare "Rosemary's Baby" to the Virgin Birth, or zombies to the Resurrection. After seeing the "Twilight" vampire movies, I had a hard time not hearing Edward Cullen's seductive voice in this hymn we often sing during the Eucharist at my church:
    The Bread that I will give
    is my Flesh for the life of the world,
    and they who eat of this bread,
    they shall live for ever,
    they shall live for ever.

    Unless you eat
    of the Flesh of the Son of Man
    and drink of his Blood,
    you shall not have life within you,
    you shall not have life within you.

What are we to make of these parallels? One could object that artists in this genre are merely appropriating sacred images for the shock value of seeing them profaned. Such was some conservative Christians' objection to the scene of ants crawling on a crucifix in AIDS activist David Wojnarowicz' short film "A Fire in My Belly", which led to the film's being removed from a Smithsonian exhibit. Yet a brief tour through medieval art shows that blood, death, torture, and the grotesque have been part of the Christian story from the beginning. Part of the tradition's power lies in how it faces these realities of the human condition and promises ultimate redemption from them.

That hope, however, is not always as evident to our senses as the suffering, and so the latter threatens to dominate our imaginations, stifling faith. The horror genre voices our fear that unredeemed suffering is the only reality, or that we will have to save ourselves from it via brute force or magical talismans. In this respect, its spirituality can sometimes be more genuine than the G-rated kitsch that's often sold under the label of Christian art.

Given the long history of "the blood of the Lamb" in devotional art and its darker counterpart, horror, how is a poet to approach this theme in a fresh way? Goodman has made several choices that help him out...

Click to continue reading this critique

This poem, our critique and contest suggestions for poems in this style appear in full at:
http://www.winningwriters.com/resources/critiques/2011/urc_1102goodman.php

See all of our poetry critiques.


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COMING MARCH 1: AWARD-WINNING POEMS
Our Spring 2010 selection of winning poems from contests we admire

COMING IN OUR MARCH 15 NEWSLETTER
The Best Free Poetry Contests for March 16-April 30